Monday, 1 February 2021

February 2021 IPMS Ottawa On-Line SHOW & TELL

Welcome to IPMS Ottawa's ongoing monthly SHOW & TELL, which allows club members to show off their completed work despite not being able to attend group meetings. Each member is invited to send in up to three photos of a model and some explanation. February marks our tenth (10th) on-line show & tell. We thank all of our members and builders for keeping alive the hobby. This month’s theme is Everything is Welcome So Build Anything for Enjoyment.

THANK YOU TO ALL PARTICIPANTS, and KEEP BUILDING. 

! Miniature world domination !

Enjoy our show, and we all hope to meet again soon.


MAIN ENTRIES


Avro 671 Rota Mk.I RAF autogyro (MiniArt 1:35)
After the crash and burn of another model build -- I don't want to talk about it -- I wanted to build something unique and OOB (out-of-box)... or at least as close to OOB that my brain/personality would allow. I thought it would be an aircraft this time around... a MANNED aircraft with a <gasp!> cockpit!  (Contrary to popular belief, I do not just build unmanned drones.)  When my gaze fell upon a MiniArt 1:35 autogyro kit, I thought to myself, "What an odd looking beasty... I must build it!" The Cierva C.30 autogyro is of Spanish origin, built under contract by several companies in the late 1930s. I chose to build mine as an Avro-built RAF trainer (1939-1940). I had never built a MiniArt kit before, though I had heard good things about them. I must say I was suitably impressed with the kit quality and detail. The front radial engine went together easily, though I did break my promise of an OOB build when I added sparkplug wires... it was just crying out for them, really!  When building the fairly simplistic cockpit, it afforded me the opportunity to try some different colour modulation and weathering techniques to mimic a well-used (but not dilapidated) trainer. Assembly of the fuselage was very straightforward, and I added a steering mechanism for the tail wheel (this is a tail dragger). Even the very spindly main landing gear presented few assembly problems and the molding of the very fine parts was exceptionally well done. I built the rotor head assembly, but kept it aside until the very end. After priming, I turned to my current favourite paint line -- AK Real Colors lacquers -- and they performed brilliantly (highly recommended). Applying the huge number of decals -- a total of NINE (I know, I am glad to have survived that ordeal) -- took a short evening. Then came the decision to clearcoat different areas in either satin or flat (for metal or fabric-covered areas, respectively). The final part was weathering, and this is where the model really started to look good. I used sponge effects for light chipping and flaking on the metal areas, then oil paint filters for colour modulation (brushed-on and splatters), and finally some pinwashes to make details pop. At the end, I installed the rotor head assembly and added the rotor blades in the transport position. When finished, I can honestly say that I am very happy with the result. And it is also a personal achievement in that this is the first manned aircraft model which I have completed in my adult life -- I have finished many UAVs and even started some other manned aircraft but never finished them. All in all it was a very fun build, highly recommended for anyone looking for a quirky subject. The full build can be found here: https://photos.app.goo.gl/Re1WtMq1mYbizkD79 
Glenn Cauley
Avro 671 Rota Mk.I RAF autogyro

Avro 671 Rota Mk.I RAF autogyro


Khador heavy warjacks (Privateer Press 30mm)
These four heavy warjacks are the latest addition to my ever-growing Khador collection from Privateer Press. 30mm scale or approximately 1/56. They are all based on the Juggernaut chassis -- a powerful, heavily-armoured steam-powered robot, most effective under the guidance of a well-trained Warcaster.
Here, I have:
2 Juggernauts (ice axe & open fist, center)
1 Destroyer (axe & cannon, viewer's left)
1 Decimator (saw & gun, viewer's right)
These were built and painted assembly-line style -- done all at once instead of one after the other. Painted with acrylics -- the pink and purple were laid down with the airbrush, then everything else was done by brush, then I finished with some glow effects done with the airbrush at the end. Bases were textured with textured artist mediums mixed with paint, then washed and dry brushed. Fairly simple models, but these were the only things I managed to finish this month due to running into unforeseen issues or a lack of motivation on everything else on my workbench.
Brian LaTour
Khador heavy warjacks

OBJECT 703, ИС-3M, IS-3M HEAVY TANK (Trumpeter 1:35)
Object 703, ИС-3M, IS-3M (Ио́сиф Ста́лин Iosef Stalin-3) heavy tank was the product of a competition between the Kirovskiy Factory No. 100 in Tankograd in Chelyabinsk (Кировский Завод No. 100), and the Chelyabinsk Tractor Factory (ЧТЗ Челябинский тракторный завод) in late 1944. The final version incorporated design aspects from both teams. The first three production tanks (project name Kirovets-1) were delivered in May 1945 and sent immediately to Berlin, but arrived after the Nazi scum had been defeated. The tanks took part in the Berlin victory parade and the Moscow victory parade. 
The model has been done as a tank of the 71st Guards Heavy Tank Regiment of the 2nd Guards Tank Army posted in the western USSR on the Polish border in 1960.
This is the Trumpeter 1:35 scale model (#00316) from 2002. The vinyl rubber-band tracks have great detail, but were too long, so I cut out one link on each side and used an office stapler to re-attach the loop. This worked perfectly, and the staples are painted black and hidden under the dust skirt. I added ten metal handles on the turret as the plastic ones do not fit to the holes. Also, I added glass to the headlights, and added metal protectors over the headlights. The machine gun has the sighting plate drilled out, and two holes drilled through the sides of the muzzle brake.
Paint is Tamiya XF-26 Deep Green, with an overspray of mixed X-8 Lemon Yellow and deep green with thinner; then an overspray of yellow and white with mostly thinner. This was my first attempt at spraying thinned yellow onto a paint job, and I was happy with the results. Decals sit on a layer of Future Floor Wax and used a bit of Solvaset to settle into the moulding of the cast turret so the crest and hull numbers take on a true painted look. The whole thing is matted down using a few coats of Vallejo clear matte. Dust and dirt are rubbed on Vallejo powders. I like tanks with track skirts as those hide my building errors.
John Clearwater
Object 703, ИС-3M, IS-3M heavy tank

Object 703, ИС-3M, IS-3M heavy tank

Object 703, ИС-3M, IS-3M heavy tank

Curtiss SB2C Helldiver (Monogram 1:48)
Started this kit 6 months ago and worked on it for a day but got frustrated with the wing-folding mechanism and put it away. I dug it out a couple of weeks ago and finished it that day. Decided to forgo the folding wing thing and built it with it folded.
Marc Racine
Curtiss SB2C Helldiver

Curtiss SB2C Helldiver

Curtiss SB2C Helldiver

Etrich Taube (Flashback Models 1:48)
Ever spend 15 hours rigging a kit? Just finished a superb 1/48 Flashback Models kit. Interior was not overly detailed so I added framing and other little bits like wire wheels and rubber plumbing O-rings for tires as the kit did not supply them.
Marc Racine
Etrich Taube

Etrich Taube

Etrich Taube

LFG Roland D.II. (Cramer 1:48)
A challenging vacuform build, kit had only 11 parts so I guess you could consider it a scratch built.
Marc Racine
LFG Roland D.II. 

LFG Roland D.II.

LFG Roland D.II.

Fokker Dr.I.  (Meng 1:32)
Flown by 10-victory German ace Werner Steinhauser. He flew 2 Dr.1's, this was his first one, the second having a yellow fuselage band with red "X's", the opposite of the early one. He flew in Manfred von Richthofen's Jasta 11, this plane was at Avesnes-le-Sec, February 1918. His second Dr.1 was at Cappy in April 1918, where Richthofen took off from on that fateful day on the 21st. After downing a balloon with FA(A) 261, Steinhäuser joined Jasta 11 at the end of 1917. He was wounded in action and forced to land on 17 March 1918. Having scored ten victories, he was killed in action in June 1918 when his Fokker DR.I was shot down over Neuilly.
Marc Racine
Fokker Dr.I.  

Fokker Dr.I. 

Fokker Dr.I. 

SNIPE SALOON (Ace 1:72)
This kit was mentioned in the Jan issue as in progress, well here it is finished!!
The Snipe Saloon was a sporty little car for those days, carrying an inline 6 cylinder engine, but I don't think the General was interested in racing!? You can see the 3 star plate on the car and General Dempsey was in charge of the British 2nd Army, and part of this force was the Canadian Army commanded by MGen Keller. This group was involved in the battles for Caen, the Carpiquet airport and closing the Falaise Gap, where the Polish forces attached to this group took the brunt of this battle! The Group turned left from here and moved up the coast, the Allies needed deep water ports for re-supply efforts to all the Armies and Antwerp was one of these targets. At the northern end of the coast they turned right and crossed the Rhine into Germany, Dempsey was the first General Officer to make this crossing! I believe he first crossed in a boat so don't know if he still had his Snipe or not??
The kit is From Ace who have improved their efforts in the last few years and now produce some excellent kits, mostly all 72nd and from the Great Wars to the modern era. It went together very well but one has to 'test fit' at almost every stage to ensure perfect joints. An earlier version of this vehicle ( almost like a half ton truck) is in the shelf queen area and I must get a wrecker to pull it out so I can finish it!! There is also a 'Woodie' version ( on the bench ) which will be presented in the 'in progress' section. To finish the line Ace is planning the convertible version complete with a figure of Monty, who liked the Snipe for getting aboot. Finished with Xtracolour paint and kit decals, highly recommended!! It is lightly weathered since it was a General Officer's staff car!
Graham Mansell
Snipe Saloon

Snipe Saloon

Snipe Saloon

CMP HOLMES WRECKER (Mirror Models 1:xx)
The Mirror Models C60S Canadian military pattern Holmes Wrecker of the light aid detachment of first Canadian Division in Holland 1945.
Kit was complex but nicely molded and has complete engine and suspension. 
Rigging of jib booms wasnt as bad as expected. Added JBot decals, petrol cans, digging tools, headlight lenses, camo net, water cans etc. Finished tamiya olive drab with black wash and flat clear. Note the allied stars askew because were Canadian! 
Ian Moore 
Holmes Wrecker

Holmes Wrecker

Taylorcraft Auster Mk V (AZ 1:xx)
The Az kit of the Taylorcraft Auster Mk V. with the Lycoming engine used by the royal Canadian army 664 coop squadron in France 1945. For artillery spotting and liaison .   
The az kit is nicely molded but the interior cockpit framing is very fiddely and makes the installation of the large glassworks of the cockpit rather difficult.  
Decals were kit supplied and paint was Tamiya dark earth /green to the standard pattern. 
A delicate kit and a nice comparison to the older Airfix Auster Mk.VII
Ian Moore. 
Taylorcraft Auster Mk V

Taylorcraft Auster Mk V

Fairchild Argus (AVI 1:xx)
RCAF. Fairchild Argus F24. #4809.  Trenton Ontario 1942
The Avi kit of the Argus/Forwarder comes with Lycoming or Ranger inline engine. The RCAF  versions used the Ranger engine. These were light utility and liaison aircraft. 
The kit has small but detailed interior. The complex struts and landing gear were not easy to assemble correctly. The fit of the small cockpit windows was also difficult.
Decals were from the kit with supplemental numerals from spares.  
The finish was natural doped aluminum Vallejo. 
Ian Moore. 
Fairchild Argus F24

Fairchild Argus F24

Beaufighter TF X (Airfix 1:72)
This model represents a Beaufighter TF X of 404 (Buffalo) Squadron in the late summer of 1944 when it was based at Davidstow Moor. LZ451 EE M was the one used by WC A.K. Gatward, the squadron commander, although it was also flown by other pilots. Gatward was the Beaufighter pilot who, in 1942, flew a single ship low level mission to Paris to strafe a daily German parade down the Champs-Élysées. This was unfortunately late that day but he and his navigator, Sgt Gilbert 'George' Fern, dropped a tricolour over the Arc de Triomph and shot up the Kriegsmarine headquarters.  LZ451 is a large part of the Beaufighter article in Carl Vincent’s book Canadian Aircraft of WW II, with many useful pictures. 
The Airfix kit is excellent, both in engineering and fit; as always problems in the build or deficiencies in the result were entirely of my own making. I added various antennae including the whip one aft of the cockpit (which really was that long) and a rear view mirror.  I replaced the 60 lb. HE rockets with aftermarket 25 lb. AP ones, as whittling down the heads of those in the kit to achieve symmetrical and consistent results proved beyond my ability. As in the photos, the rails were staggered in inclination (to get the desired spread of the salvo).  Decals from Extradecal. 
I tried to obtain the worn look of the extra dark sea grey upper surface colour by using three slightly different manufacturers’ paints – all of which purported to be dark sea grey (to simulate the fading of EDSG). The garish red primer paint around the cannon ports, which reminds one of the Joker’s use of lipstick, really was that extensive in the photos.
This model will be paired with my Blenheim IVf in my tribute to 404 Squadron. 
J.G.
Beaufighter TF X of 404 (Buffalo) Squadron

Beaufighter TF X of 404 (Buffalo) Squadron

Beaufighter TF X of 404 (Buffalo) Squadron

CF-100 Canuck (Hobby Craft 1:72)
I didn't know much about the CF-100, so I resolved to fix that by building this kit.
I make my models in flying configuration, so no landing gear to bother with, just the doors. There were no after-market parts readily available, so I didn't use any – it still looks like a CF-100.  I seem to have back luck with canopies. The masking left some adhesive behind, and I dumped a bunch of thinner on it to clean it off – big mistake, as it cracked in 2 places!  Add one more thing to the 'don't do that' list.
I couldn't decide between bare wing tips, rocket pods, or tip tanks, so I did all of them.  I glued a pair of sewing pins into each wing tip and made corresponding keyholes in the rocket pods and fuel tanks - it can be displayed in 3 different configurations.  Maybe someday I'll make the small practice rocket pods (I bet those will never be available for purchase!).
Paints are Model Master enamels – I'm still not brave enough to try lacquer.  The kit decals almost made me cry – too much ink, colours off-register in 2 dimensions, nacelle art not matching actual photos.  There were 2 copies included, as if that compensated.  Actually, it did – I was able to salvage a fin flash from each sheet to use instead of the wrongly shaped ones from the sheet I managed to find.  I modelled 18551 from 410 "Cougar" Sqn here at Uplands.
Peter de Salis
CF-100

CF-100

CF-100


WORKS-IN-PROGRESS


Marianne (FeR Miniatures, 1:12)
A resin bust of Marianne, the personification of the French Republic, in 1:12 scale. The bust was three pieces and went together nicely, though a little work was needed on the join of her left arm to the torso. The right arm with the sword fit well enough that I could leave it unglued and paint in sub-assemblies, which made painting the sword and the hair much easier.
Painted with acrylics -- mostly a combination of Reaper and P3 miniature paints, Vallejo Metal Color (sword only), and acrylic artist inks from the art store. The skin tones and the robes were done using my usual approach to painting busts -- zenithal prime, followed by wet-blending, followed by airbrush glazing. These secrets may be spilled in detail in a future issue of RT, so devoted readers with an interest in painting busts will want to keep an eye out. I've included a picture from before and after the airbrush glaze; you can see how much the airbrush can help smooth out a wet-blended base coat.
I played with a lot of purples and blues in the shadows, finding purple to be a nice shadow colour for the khakis and ivory tones in the robe. On the skin, my main shadow colour was a mix of Payne's Grey (blue-black) and Flame Red artist inks, which made for a very interesting desaturated purple tone when mixed together. I wasn't satisfied with my initial attempt on the skin, so I reinforced the highlights and shadows and went for another round of airbrush glazing to blend them together and really cranked up the contrast, which made for a much more striking result.
Unfortunately, I wasn't able to finish her this month -- Aside from a few small touchups, I need to get a placard printed for the plinth. Sadly, the local libraries and print shops are all closed or on reduced service due to the COVID lockdown, so I'll have to wait until after lockdown to finish her. Hopefully that will be before our French-themed contest in March...
Brian LaTour



Simca 5cv (Tamiya 1:35)
I had decided to participate in one of the 24 hour builds which was taking place on the weekend of January 30-31. I picked the 1:35 scale Simca 5cv by Tamiya, because it would fit well with my Citroen I finished last month. I ended up cancelling out due to other commitments, but I now have all the parts washed and cleaned, and a solid coat of chrome over the bumpers. I will probably build it during the year, once I go back to having spare time. Right now, COVID is affecting me in a good way, because I finally gained a full-time position for the rest of the year! However, I miss the time needed to sit down and build anything new. If my new class ever stops acting up, and my teaching partner is amenable, maybe I can get back to doing student builds this spring!
Ken




Flettner Fl-282 V-6 Kolibri synchrocopter (MiniArt 1:35)
Hot on the heels of finishing my 1:35 autogyro, I dove in right away to another MiniArt 1:35 kit: this time a Flettner Fl-282 V-6 Kolibri synchrocopter. There are 4 different variants offered in separate kits, I chose to build the earliest variant available. Going in, I hoped that I would enjoy the great kit quality that I enjoyed on the previous MiniArt kit, and so far, so good! This time I threw off the self-imposed shackles of doing an OOB (out-of-box) build; who was I kidding, indeed? This kit proved to be a bit more challenging with origami-like structures that require very carely alignment and cementing to ensure proper angles; I could easily see one mistake early on resulting in improper fitment as more things were added on. The molding of some parts is extremely delicate, requiring very careful part removal from frames followed by careful clean-up.  When I got to the internal radial engine, the gloves came off.  I plan to pose the model with engine bay panels open, which meant that the engine would be seen, which meant that I could go ahead and add a bit more detail. I am adding missing sparkplugs (14) with associated wiring, cylinder head oil pressure lines, and other odds & sods for a bit of visual interest. I am in contact with a model developer who made his own 1:18 Kolibri as a 3D printed kit (available through Shapeways); he has been an absolute fountain of knowledge. It also turns out that two of my modeling friends have also built variants of this kit in the past, and liked it.  At this time, I am part way through the engine assembly, just about to move on to the transmission and control rod structures. Onwards and upwards!  (Aircraft pun intended.) The full build is here: https://photos.app.goo.gl/gpAuWD5ugRvdJaAz9
Glenn Cauley




Ever had a modelling project balloon to something that seems out of control? Yeah, I know, us modellers would never let that happen...
Well from last month's 'in progress' and RT Project #2, it now seems like a huge styrene snowball rolling downhill at myself!! In the great zone of postal mysteries are 4, yes 4, of the newest IBG Diamond Ts heading my way; why 4 I hear you ask? Well, Canada had several of the “201” WB trucks, not just the general service ones for Bailey gear, but also a crane ( using the crane from the Airfix recovery set), 2 versions of workshops (one with a metal housing the other frame & canvas), ones with lifting gear to haul Bailey pontoon boats, folding ones and rigid built versions, Canada also used a tractor hauling a tank transport trailer very similar to the one used with Scammell tractors!! So one can see the NEED for more trucks, and the bonus with these latest versions they have a 50 cal mount on the cab, so some weapons for use on other vehicles!! I have had some help from modellers on our Braille Scale DG and one of them lives in the Borden area and supplied me with some great info on the machinery trucks, thanks Neil. Yes I know there is a real one in the War Museum, but, this pandemic thing is a problem!!??
In the first picture you will see 3 truck frames; the Diamond Ts had 2 standard sizes – “151” & “172”, we (Canada) had the "201” WB created and the tank transporters had a 179” WB, all the kits have the smallest one! This is why to do any of the 'other' trucks you need to stretch the frame, so 17.6 mm for the 201 WB truck, 9.87mm for the 179 WB truck and 7.4mm for 172 WB truck; that's a lot of math so if anyone feels the need to check it, feel free, I was wrong once last year!? In the pic are from left to right the 151, 179, & 201 WB frames. I used Evergreen HO scale strips, a 2 x 4 strip to go into the inside of the 'U' shaped frame then to replace the outer portion a 2 x 10 strip, but in reality it needs a 3 x 10 piece so I glued a 1 x 10 on top the get the right thickness. The truck box is being scratch built also using Evergreen plastic, and the plan (?) is to build some Bailey Bridge sections as a load?!
Graham Mansell



X-Wing fighter (BanDai 1:48)
The X-Wing fighter is a motion, light and sound effects kit. It is a ‘lego-like’ construct which is molded in several colours so as to provide the assembler (I have purposely not used the word builder in this context) to put the kit together without the need for paint. The X-Wing sits on a stand which provides power and control to the effects which are resident in the electronics/ motor box inside the fighter.
I use the phrase ‘lego-like’ as the pieces are fitted together by cleverly designed connectors that snap together, not that the pieces are shaped or assemble like Lego blocks. However, as a model, it suffers from this style of assembly in that the pieces do not always line up in a smooth surface, similar to Lego constructs. I used Tamiya cement to hold the parts together so I could sand unevenness and fill the crevasses that occurred between some of the parts. Unfortunately, this required me to rescribe panel lines and replace raised details. Bandai provides stick stickers for the markings as well as a number of the coloured panels. They also provided the same markings as water-slide decals; however, the decal appears to be pixilated as if printed versus silk-screened. Except for a few decals (helmet, droid and spiral on laser cannons), I masked and airbrushed all the panels and markings primarily using AK Real Colour paint. The model has been gloss coated in preparation for panel lining and will be given a dull coat before finishing the weathering.
Bill Eggleton




Inbox review KV-2 heavy cartoon tank (Xinshi Hobby 1:egg scale)
This is a first peek inbox review of the Xinshi Hobby kid's snap-tight cartoon kit of the Soviet KV-2 heavy tank from the Great Patriotic War, with decals of cute furry animals. Xinshi kit #07317Z  (or a big "1" in a circle). Despite being a kid's kit, it is remarkably high-tech. This is a beautifully slide-moulded kit with lots of details in an insulated double-hulled box. Mine showed up from China by post in about 4-5 weeks.  I can picture those cute furry animals rolling over Nazi scum now! It is a total delight.  The inbox review video is below and at this link
https://www.youtube.com/watch?reload=9&v=RBbw9o2Gb1Y
John Clearwater 


Sunday, 3 January 2021

January 2021 IPMS Ottawa On-Line SHOW & TELL

Welcome to IPMS Ottawa's ongoing monthly SHOW & TELL, which allows club members to show off their completed work despite not being able to attend group meetings. Each member is invited to send in up to three photos of a model and some explanation. January marks our ninth (9th) on-line show & tell. We thank all of our members and builders for keeping alive the hobby. The theme this month is WHAT I GOT FOR CHRISTMAS, but everything is welcome.

THANK YOU TO ALL PARTICIPANTS, and KEEP BUILDING. 

! Miniature world domination !

Enjoy our largest show so far, and we all hope to meet again soon.


FINISHED MODELS

KV-2 Tank (Trumpeter 1:35)
In an attempt to lighten up the shelf of doom I'm concentrating on finishing up stalled projects. Attached are photos of the 1:35 Trumpeter KV-2 "large turret" I built this model many years ago but somehow never got around to painting it. It is out of the box. Markings are painted with stencils. Mud is Liquitex acrylic gel medium mixed with sweeping compound. Paint is all Tamiya acrylics, weathering is homemade oil washes and pastels. 
Ian MacAulay
(editors note: The text on the turret says колхо́зни kolkhozni, and refers to workers on collective farms. Also of note is that the collective farm tractor stations mechanics could repair any tank engine, so were very useful to the armoured forces.)

KV-2 "large turret"

KV-2 "large turret"

KV-2 "large turret"

AVRO CF-105 Arrow (Hobbycraft 1:72)
I quickly assembled this kit out of the box nearly 2 decades ago, and started brush painting it. Unhappy with the result, I abandoned it. So, to clear off the shelf of doom, I resolved to do a better job. I snapped off the landing gear, gear doors, and engine intakes (on purpose) and pitot tubes (by accident) and fixed what I could.  The canopy was a lost cause (glued on and crazed with poly cement) so I just sanded it to a hopefully better shape. Paints are Model Master enamels and the kit decals were used; but I think some of them are not quite the correct size.
This is not the most recent version of this kit – I would love to have one of those, which I would make into the proposed rocket-boosted Zero Length Launch configuration.
Peter de Salis
AVRO CF-105 Arrow

AVRO CF-105 Arrow

AVRO CF-105 Arrow

8 inch Siege Howitzer (Roden 1:35)
Royal Canadian Artillery. 8 inch seige howitzer, France, 1918. On traverse platform. Colour scheme per Canadian War Museum display example 
Ian Moore
Royal Canadian Artillery. 8 inch seige howitzer

Royal Canadian Artillery. 8 inch seige howitzer
Bellanca CH300 Pacemaker.  (Dorawings 1:72)  
Modified rudder,added photo rear windows, installed floats. Markings per RCAF 1930. Trenton & Rockcliffe photo survey flights. 
Ian Moore
Bellanca CH300 Pacemaker

Bellanca CH300 Pacemaker

Bellanca CH300 Pacemaker

Brewster Bermuda ( Special hobby 1:72)
One of 3 Bermudas used by RCAF during WWII at Suffield Alberta for “special” projects, essentially because they were underpowered, obsolete, and disposable.
The kit is large for a 1:72 single engine and has a lot of detailed resin and photoetch parts; and masking the greenhouse was a chore.  
Tamiya paints, kit decals, vallejo panel washes, replaced gun barrels and pitot and added aerials.
Ian Moore
Brewster Bermuda

Brewster Bermuda

Brewster Bermuda

Sikorsky H-5 (AMP 1:48)
The rare kit of the Sikorsky H-5. S51. The first RCAF helicopter 13 of the type. This one 9603 served at RCAF Trenton in 1947. Kit assembled well with detailed interior. Used decals bits from Belcher Bits Canadian helicopter markings and squadron codes per patrick Martin aircraft marking references. This was the only aircraft with rescue markings. The stretcher carriers were supplied but used aluminum tubing for sturdiness. AMP supplied canopy masks for the extensive greenhouse. Black decal stripes were used to simulate the black rubber glazing insulation. The aircraft had both double and triple blade tail rotors at different periods. It remains as a museum exhibit at CFB Trenton's RCAF Museum.
Tamiya and vallejo paints with grey/black panel washes.
Ian Moore
Sikorsky H-5. S51

Sikorsky H-5. S51

Sikorsky H-5. S51
SNOWMAN
A quick project to further explore the uses of Tamiya Texture paint.
On our armour dicussion forum a thread went up to show winter projects!? A quick look thru my completed kits failed to find any with even a tiny snow theme?? I had bought a bottle of this Tamiya diorama detailing putty (for lack of a better name) and wondered if it could be rolled into a ball. Well the pic shows that is possible, once dry it can be manipulated with most tools from our benches, i.e. the orange sprue carrot was inserted in a hole drilled into 'Frosty's' face.
Graham Mansell


AMBULANCES (now 54 in this collection)
M274 Mule (S-Model 1:72)
PZ KFW 1 Ausf. A (ACE 1:72)
SD KFZ 265 Kleiner Panzer (S-Model 1:72)
GAZ-55 M.1938 (Zebrano 1:72)
Janyce and I have been retired for some years now and are basically home bodies.  We no longer travel much, if any, so the Covid situation has not put as much change in our daily lives as it has for some, especially those with many family members.  Since we fall into the older category of the species we have restricted our errands and shopping as much as possible. Online shopping and drive-by pick ups work well for us. We look forward to many catch-up BBQs and get togethers once this pandemic is over!!!
I have assembled 6 small summaries of completed projects from March to end of year 2020, all of these 15 projects are Out-Of-Box. Since joining IPMS Ottawa I have built just over 300 models.
I started a collection of Ambulances about 7 years ago, it has grown quickly.  I was looking to start something new, as in large project.
I wasn't quite sure what to build...Janyce suggested checking what I had in similar kits and see if more could be obtained....oops!! I had already built some RCN, RCMP and RCAF aircraft collections and the rest are a variety of projects and scales. My aviation projects are almost all 1/72. I am still adding to the RCAF collection.  I also started a 1/700 ship collection of all the ship museums that Janyce and I have visited.
Michael Roy
GAS-55 M.1938

M274 Mule

PZ KFW 1 Ausf. A

SD KFZ 265 Kleiner Panzer

FIRE-RESCUE (now 3 in collection)
Bedford QL Fire Tender (IBG 1:72)
PMZ-2 (Zebrano 1:72)
Michael Roy
Bedford QL Fire Tender

PMZ-2

MILITARY VEHICLES (now 69 in this collection)
I started building 1:72 vehicles with the idea in mind to try dioramas later on....didn't really happen,
but I still like these little vehicles as a distraction from aircraft.
AS-37 (ACE 1:72)
Long Range Dessert Group Patrol Car (Dragon 1:72)
Michael Roy
AS-37

Long Range Dessert Group Patrol Car 

MOTORCYCLES 1:35 (now 27 in this collection)
I used to own and drive motorcycles and scooters while living in France and Germany as a teenager.
Bikes are still in the blood.
BMW R75 w/sidecar, 2 trailers (LionRoar, 1:35)
Honda C-100 1938 (Diopark 1:35)
PMZ A-750 w/sidecar, civilian (AIM Fan Model 1:35)
Michael Roy
BMW R75 w/sidecar, 2 trailers

Honda C-100 1938

PMZ A-750 w/sidecar, civilian

FIXED WING (now 69 in in this collection)
My original goal for the RCAF collection was to try and build most, if not all, of the aircraft that my father worked on in his 30 years in the RCAF. He could remember most of the aircraft that he worked on post war but his war time records are sketchy. He was with a unit that would do maintenance on various aircraft, like one day Mosquitos and the next Lancasters. As an aside Dad and Mom (she was RAF) met while working on Lancasters.
RCAF Cornell (Special Hobby 1:72 JBOT Decals)
RCAF CT-134 Muskateer (Airfix 1:72 CanMilAir Decals)
RCAF T-33 (Heller 1:72 Leading Edge Decals)
Michael Roy

RCAF Cornell

RCAF CT-134 Muskateer

RCAF T-33

RIFLES (now 14 in this collection, 10 are rifles)
All weapons are 1:3 scale by Trumpeter except the last item.
Many years ago I was quite interested in pistol/rifle target shooting.  As a young adult this became a serious hobby. I owned a few pistols and even had all the gear to reload various calibers.  Firearms are still somewhat of an interest.
When these 1:3 scale weapons first came out they really caught my interest especially since there were indications of many more pistols and long arms planned.  Well we all know what happens to some plans....they did not happen. Nonetheless I picked up a few of these kits with the hope that there would be more.  I built 5 of them a number of years ago.  I came across a few more on sale and acquired another 5 of the kits. Long story short....I built these 10 and no more.  Now that we have down-sized I decided to give the 2 frames to  my youngest son for his man cave.
Left frame
XM177E1
XM177E2
M4A1/M203
M733
SR16
Right frame
M16
M16A1
M16A2/M203
M16A4
M14 w/Mark IV Scope, Dragon
Michael Roy
RIFLES

2K12 KUBE S.A.M. SYSTEM (Trumpeter 1:35)
The 2K12 Kube  (cube) short- and medium-range surface-to-air anti-aircraft missile system was used by the USSR, all Warsaw Treaty countries, and various importers which bought it from the USSR. It was designed to destroy aircraft up to 10 000 m altitude flying under 2000 km/hr with a single shot kill probability of 0.7. The model shows a regular Soviet Army air defence battery live firing a missile during the May 1977 Zapad-77 exercises for most of the Warsaw Treaty members held in the USSR, Poland, Czechoslovakia and the DDR.
Development of this crucial battlefield SAM system began in 1958, and a prototype shot down an  aircraft in 1963. This was the first combined solid rocket motor and ramjet ever deployed.
The main customer was the Soviet Army, followed by all the air defence forces of the allied Warsaw Treaty countries. The USSR sold the systems all over the world. The greatest combat success came in 1973 when the Egyptian army used to it shot down at least 40 Israeli fighter aircraft, much to the surprise and consternation of the USA. More bizarrely, the Iraqis used it to shot down a fair number of US-made jets from the Iranian air force in the early part of the Ira-Iraq War Gulf War I. During the US war against Iraq, the two USAF aircraft were  hit by the Kube: a B-52 and an F-16. The USAF made up a story about a friendly fire incident to cover the damage to the B-52. Syrian forces were able to destroy some 10% of incoming USA/UK/French missiles in the April 2018 attacks.
This is the Trumpeter 1:35 scale kit #00361 from 2005, and it is a very nice kit with a lot of detail and more than enough links for the tracks. A small P.E. sheet adds lovely bits. Paints are Tamiya Deep Green for the T.E.L. tractor body, and NATO Green for the missiles. The missiles have been left clean as from the factory, while the armour was rubbed with powders and central-European dirt/mud from Vallejo. A pencil edge made for metal rubbed spots and scratches. I added a painted Xmas tree ornament and cotton wool fuzz as a blast/flame for a launch.
John Clearwater
2K12 Куб KUBE S.A.M. Launcher

2K12 Куб KUBE S.A.M. Launcher

2K12 Куб KUBE S.A.M. Launcher

Citroen 11cv Traction Avant (Tamiya 1:35)
As I mentioned in the December meeting, it took me some research to figure out what the prototype vehicle represented, which was a late 1930's (1938-42) 11BL. There were a number of details which, on researching the car further, I found to be curious. The interior design was representative of an earlier production series, while the taillights looked to be from the postwar period. Needless to say, if you found the right wheels and changed some design elements (hood louvers, lights, etc.), you could make the car represent a model from 1934-52. The paint was mostly Tamiya, though the wheels were painted in Gravity Colours Butternut Yellow. Chrome trim was Alclad. 
It was nice to have some time off during the Christmas holidays, but I know that I am bound to be swamped as soon as the schools go back to class on the 11th of January. Hopefully, we will find chances to see each other once the lockdown is ended, but who knows?
Ken Nesbitt  
Citroen 11cv Traction Avant

Citroen 11cv Traction Avant

SOMUA S35 (Meng)
This is the Somua S35 toon tank from Meng and my first armour model ever!
The past month or two at work has been very busy for me. I was feeling very frustrated with work one night, so I decided to log off, pull out a nice relaxing model kit, and get to work. Next thing I knew, I was feeling a lot more relaxed and had a nearly-assembled toon tank.
The kit had options for both French and German markings; I obviously chose French. Inspired by the box art, I tried a new style to give it a more cartoonish finish. After airbrushing the camo and doing some dry brushing and sponge chipping to accentuate the corners, I took out 2/0 Raphael 8404 brush, my wet palette, and some nice thin paints with a touch of flow improver, and got to work painting hundreds of tiny hash marks, accentuating the many curved surfaces on this model.
Brian LaTour
(editor's note: The French Somua Company (Société d'outillage mécanique et d'usinage d'artillerie) built 440 of these machines which were used mostly by the Nazi army after the defeat of France.)

SOMUA S35

DH.115 Vampire T.11  (Merlin Models 1:72)
This is the 2-seater trainer version of the Vampire in one of the kit-supplied schemes to make an RAF version circa 1955.
I bought this kit on a whim for $5, thinking it would be a good practice model; after all, how bad could it be? The answer is that it gave my meagre filling, sanding, and correcting skills a good workout.  There was no cockpit, and the supplied metal ejection seats did not fit. Since I badly messed up the canopy trying to polish it, that didn't matter in the end, so with nothing to lose I also scraped off the extra window frames (that seem to be for the night fighter version). The tail fins were the wrong shape (regular version), and the instructions (which I luckily found on the internet) were a single paragraph that may as well have said "make these parts look like a Vampire".
I prefer to build airplanes in flying configuration, so I gladly abandoned the landing gear. Paints are Model Master enamels and the kit decals were used, although they were in rough shape (and included only fin flashes for 1 fin). I had to add the intake vanes, and also added the nearby holes, marker lights, aerials, and pitot tube.
Peter de Salis
DH.115 Vampire T.11 

DH.115 Vampire T.11 

DH.115 Vampire T.11 

Heinkel He111 "Zwilling" (Italeri 1:72)
A strange 5-engined and successful modified Heinkel He111 aircraft that was used for towing the huge German Gigant troop carrier glider.
Marc Racine
(editors note: a total of 21 were built or converted to the "Twin" (Zwilling) configuration. This was a less-than-sucessfful design)

Zwilling

Zwilling

Zwilling

AMC DH-9 reconnaissance/bomber (Wingnut Wings 1:32)
Another wonderful kit from Wingnut Wings with tons of detail and fit tolerances of a Rolls Royce. Flown by J.A. Gray and J.J. Comerford. On 27 June 1918 Gray and Comerford were near Bruges when they were hit by flak and forced down in a Dutch field and were interned (for a few months).
Marc Racine
AMC DH-9 reconnaissance/bomber

AMC DH-9 reconnaissance/bomber

AMC DH-9 reconnaissance/bomber

Zero A6M3 (20th Century Toys 1:32)
A really odd kit from a company who sold pre-assembled and painted models in 1:32 and 1:16 scales. They branched out with a small series of 1:32 model kits which had some parts assembled with screws, in this case the engine, bottom wing and fuselage halves. A fun kit to build even though mine had a badly half molded engine manifold ring. 
Marc Racine
Zero A6M3

Zero A6M3

Zero A6M3

PBY Catalina (1/72 Airfix 1:72)
Flown by Royal Canadian Air Force Squadron Leader Leonard Birchall, the “Saviour of Ceylon”, He was flying a Catalina aircraft before being shot down and captured near the island of Ceylon by the Japanese in 1942. Before being shot down, Birchall located and warned of a Japanese attack on Ceylon which caused the failure of the Japanese attack.
Marc Racine
Birchall's Catalina

Birchall's Catalina

Birchall's Catalina

Supermarine Walrus Mk1 (Airfix 1:48)
One of Airfix's nicest kits I have ever built; superb interior molding and detail and fit was awesome. Got it at one of IPMS's swap meets for a song as it did not have the proper box.
Marc Racine
Supermarine Walrus Mk1

Supermarine Walrus Mk1

Supermarine Walrus Mk1


WORKS IN PROGRESS

Avro 671 Rota Mk1 Autogyro (MiniArt 1:35)
After a detailed build went sideways, I wanted to build something OOB (bahahahaha <breathe> bahahahahahahaha). But seriously, I wanted something fun and quirky to get my mojo (and sanity) back. I happened upon a recent release from MiniArt: a 1/35 RAF autogyro (aka Cierva C.30) which was a Spanish design from the 1930s. I had not yet built a MiniArt kit, though I knew their kits have a good reputation. I almost made it through the radial engine stage before I broke down on the whole OOB thing by adding sparkplug wires. Oh well, it was worth a try.    I have the cockpit nearly assembled, and that is the point I am now at.  So far it is a straightforward build with nice detail. (Note: It is killing me a bit inside not to add more cockpit detail, but I must remain strong!)  Blog is here: https://photos.app.goo.gl/Re1WtMq1mYbizkD79
Glenn Cauley
Avro 671 Rota Mk1 Autogyro cockpit

Avro 671 Rota Mk1 Autogyro cockpit


Avro 671 Rota Mk1 Autogyro engine


RT project #1
Spitfire Mk XIV
Since the latest issue came with decals I thought it was about time I used some of these!? The Spit 14 caught my eye and I excavated some Mk XIV kits from Stash Mountain!! These are the new(ish) Sword kits and in 1:72 you only have 3 companies to choose from – Academy (looks like a Spit?), Fujimi – good kit; a bit fussy to build, and the new Sword kits. I have built one each of the first two so it was time for a Sword kit, not going to go with a lot of detail, belts only.
Graham Mansell
Spitfire Mk XIV

RT project #2
Diamond T truck
Diamond T truck with the extended frame, a Canadian only feature, lengthened to 201 inches, primarily to carry; to steal a line from the movie about an unreachable bridge - “That Bailey stuff!” Martin, one of our members (IPMS Canada) from Denmark built one of these trucks using the new(ish) IBG kit, and since I had done some research on this but never translated it to styrene thought this would be an interesting conversion. So out came the IBG Diamond T and construction has commenced.
Graham Mansell
Diamond T truck extended chassis

C130 H (Zvezda 1:72)
A really quick review
Recently Zvezda released a brand new tool C130 H, and IMHO this kit is an absolute gem! It has finely recessed panel lines and details that no other 1:72 Hercules kit has; engine intakes to the compressor face and exhausts back to the turbine!! They have also engineered and designed this kit to be built as one of the extended Hercs!!! After releasing the H model they announced an extended fuse J model!!! I am planning to build a CC130 NT (Nav Training) #305 the bird I flew for my final Nav checkride, so need to build the training consoles!!?!
The first pic shows the flight deck with the detail other kit makers have neglected, the second pic shows the fuselage and the fact that Zvezda did thorough research – the crease towards the bottom of the fuse is only on one other kit - the ancient Airfix kit but it had raised panel lines! In the third pic you can see the cargo deck and it's detail but the upper piece has been cut as per instructions since it is long enough for the extended versions!
And now for those who have or are planning to win the lottery!! Eduard has released about (??) 5 etch sets for this kit; the usual stuff interior/exterior and I noticed that for the cargo compartment they have the curved tracks that the rear side doors slide up on when opened! Another company has released a Gunship conversion, still another has made, in resin, stressed skin control surfaces, and IIRC resin & etch interior detail, also there is a resin set (large) to duplicate the rivets on this aircraft! And yes the decals are starting to trickle out.
Graham Mansell
C130 H cockpit construction


Super Snipe (Ace 1:72)
This really nice little kit is coming close to the finish line. The pic shows the interior detail, an umbrella and briefcase and will finished as General Dempsey's car from post Normandy. He was in charge of the British and Canadian Armies that moved NW out of France and eventually to the Rhine. General Dempsey was the first senior officer to cross the Rhine!
Graham Mansell
Super Snipe


CHRISTMAS FUN & TOOLS


Clockwork...thing
I made a wargaming terrain piece out of leftover clock kit pieces— some sort of steampunk clockwork thing, shown here being defended by some Cygnar soldiers.
Simple paint job — spray painted it black, then dry brushed successively lighter silver colours onto it with a large dollar store makeup brush. Finished it off with some Citadel Typhus Corrosion and Reaper Brown Wash & Black Wash dabbed on with a big brush.
Brian LaTour


PAINT!
So, as per usual I didn't get any models for Xmas. Something about: "You already have more than you could possibly build in TWO lifetimes!!."  There is possibly a small shred of truth to this statement. Santa did however bring a lovely container of Ferrero Rocher that once emptied I was able to repurpose into a case for my Humbrol enamel tins!  I also got a "joke" Lego snowspeeder in my stocking that my daughter challenged me to make into a diorama. I spent 5 minutes building the speeder and a whole 15 minutes creating this base!  I hope that everyone had a good holiday!! 
Ian MacAulay





Inbox review of TITANIC Seal & Iceberg Scene (Suyata, 1:egg scale)
This is a first look in the box of the new TITANIC egg/cartoon scale model from the new Suyata models released in 2020. TITANIC SEAL & ICEBERG SCENE, Suyata (HK) International Co., Ltd, of Hong Kong (kit #SL001). The kit is not officially available in North America due to lack of a distributor, but I acquired this one from a factory in China. It arrived in about 15 days by post.
Quality and details are excellent. It can be made waterline or full hull version. All parts are moulded in appropriate colours, but any purist will of course paint most everything. Technically it is a snap-together kit, but of course purists will glue everything in place and add rigging. Overall it is 150 mm long. The only negative is the lack of decals for the hull. This seems odd given the quality and the decal for the base/stand. Overall this kit is far and away better than the new Meng cartoon kit of the Titanic, which has fewer parts, fewer decks, and is overall smaller. Real wooden decks as extras are available for this Suyata kit on-line for only about $10. This would make a great kit to do with a child over a weekend, or for an actual modeller to do up fancy. For reasons I do not understand, all of the six seals in the kit have names. Even the small seals are the size of a funnel on the ship.
My video review on youtube is attached here:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KjsfoTdB2cU